You are reading

Video: Man Slashes Two Elderly Straphangers on 7 Train in Woodside

July 12, 2020 By Christian Murray

Disturbing video has gone viral of a slashing that took place on the 7 train in Woodside last week.

The video shows two straphangers, both in their 70s, being attacked by a man with a pocket knife on a Manhattan-bound train– between 61st Street and 52nd Street– at around 7:25 a.m. July 5.

The knife wielding man, identified as Patrick Chambers, 46, slashed one of the men in the stomach and the chest in what police say was an unprovoked attack.

Another man, tried to intervene and was attacked but Chambers who slashed the man’s left wrist and upper chest, police said.

Chambers was arrested by police after the train pulled into the 52nd St. station. He has been charged with assault, menacing and criminal possession of a weapon.

The two seniors were transferred by EMS to Elmhurst Hospital with non-life-threatening wounds, according to police.

email the author: [email protected]

5 Comments

Click for Comments 
All Lives Matter

I hope people will come out and protest against the violence against the elderly and children.

Reply
Never gonna happen

It doesn’t fit the narrative. Trump triggered zoomer and crime supporter please reply including comments about the wall.

Reply
😩

What does Jimmy have to say about about this? where’s AOC ? where the social workers ?

8
2
Reply
You asked for it.

This is what happens when you release inmates from Rikers Island and defund the police. People like Jessica Ramos & AOC , Eric Adams that are against NYPD from doing their job . The worst Mayor NYC has ever had is Bill DeBlasio. But you people want it, you will get it .😈

10
2
Reply

Leave a Comment
Reply to this Comment

All comments are subject to moderation before being posted.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Recent News

Two-Wheel Traffic Up on Bridges, But Cash-Strapped City Can’t Expand Crowded Bike Lanes

Even with many New Yorkers staying home during the pandemic, growing legions of bicyclists are pedaling over the city-run East River bridges that link Queens and Brooklyn to Manhattan.

“It can get pretty tight up there at times,” Andre Figueroa, 19, of Astoria, said before riding into Manhattan over the Queensboro Bridge’s shared cyclist and pedestrian path. “Ever since the start of this pandemic, you’ve seen a real change when it comes to people bicycling.”