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Pier 1 at World’s Fair Marina To be Demolished and Rebuilt

Photo courtesy of Riverkeeper

Nov. 20, 2018 By Meghan Sackman

The Parks Department unveiled its plan for the $44 million overhaul of the World’s Fair Marina before Community Board 3 last week.

The marina, located on Flushing Bay and part of Flushing Meadows Corona Park, is undergoing a major revamp following damage caused by Superstorm Sandy and decades of deterioration.

A large portion of the marina, which consists of two main piers that are used by cruise operators and for recreational boating, will be demolished and rebuilt.

Pier 1, the bigger of the two, will be knocked down and replaced by a larger pier that goes farther out into the bay and into deeper waters.

The new pier will include many of the same features as there are now such as boat slips, concessions, bathrooms, a fishing area, a ferry landing and docking areas for boats. There will be new fencing and railings and improved security.

Pier 1 is currently closed to all users but recreational boaters with smaller vessels.

The second pier, known as Pier 3, will be repaired but not reconstructed. The original Pier 2 was destroyed years ago.

The marina currently has 250 boat slips, a number that will likely to go up to 300 upon the completion of the marina.

The overhaul is expected to be completed toward the end of 2021, with construction likely to begin in the middle of 2019. Private boat owners who use the marina will have to relocate their vessels elsewhere while construction is being done.

The plan is being funded by $8.3 million from Federal Emergency Management Agency and $36.5 million in Mayoral funding.

The Parks Department held public scoping meetings on the overhaul and most of the features incorporated were called for as part of that.

According to the Parks Department, the marina will be much more resilient upon completion.

The pier will be constructed with concrete and steel, replacing the wooden pilings of old.

Parks Department Design Plan for Pier 1

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4 Comments

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JHeights my whole life

I work at Citifield surrounded by that water it doesn’t smell bad. What does smell at times is that former junkyard on the other side of 126th street.

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FlushTownB

Maybe they can use this to bring the NYC ferry to Flushing. Would be nice if they could add a route that began in either Bayside or College Point and ended at Wall street.

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BOB

The DEP recently finished a multi-million dollar project to remove the sediment that was giving off the unpleasant odor. The last summer the smell you speak of was non-existent.

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