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New York City is ‘$9 Billion in the Hole,’ Mayor Says

Mayor Bill de Blasio said the city is predicted to lose $9 billion in tax revenue between the remainder of this fiscal year and next (Michael Appleton/ Mayoral Photography Office)

May 27, 2020 By Allie Griffin

New York City faces a whopping $9 billion deficit due to the economic fallout of the coronavirus, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced today.

The budget hole was originally estimated to be around $7.4 billion through to June 30, 2021 — but has widened by another $1.6 billion, the mayor said.

“We are now $9 billion in the hole between the current fiscal year and the one that begins July 1,” de Blasio said at City Hall.

The city’s fiscal year begins July 1 and the city council and mayor must pass a 2021 budget by the end of June.

The city is on a time crunch to either make additional budget cuts or find others sources of funds– such as tapping into its reserves or borrowing money. All options are on the table.

“There is literally no way we can solve this problem without federal help or without having to make very very painful choices that will affect the quality of life in this city, our ability to provide basic services and how many people we’re able to employ,” de Blasio said.

He warned that without federal help, the loss of revenue would continue into the next fiscal year and beyond.

An economic relief package that would provide $17.2 billion to New York City has passed the House of Representatives — but has met fierce resistance from the Republican-controlled Senate.

De Blasio urged Congress to pass the package of bills named the HEROES Act.

However, if the federal government doesn’t provide relief, he said New York City could borrow the funds as a last resort.

He is calling on the state to grant the city borrowing power as a “safety net.”

“It’s not something we want to use or intend to use in the first instance,” he said. “But it’s something we need as a last resort if our federal government isn’t there for us.”

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Larry Penner

Mayor Bill de Blasio reminds me of J. Wellington Wimpy who famously said “I’ll gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today.” TANSTAAFL – There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch or all the goodies promised by de Blasio over the past six plus years of his administration. He increased spending by $20 billion over the past six years and increased the city payroll by 30,000 under his watch. He never put aside any real money for a rainy day or economic downturn. The private sector and citizens make difficult financial decisions on how to use existing resources. New Yorkers prioritize their own family budgets. They make the hard choices in how existing household financial resources will be spent. If it can wait until later, it should be postponed till next year. City Hall must do the same. Mayor de Blasio should lead by example and take a pay cut. So too, should his commissioners, deputy commissioners along with any of his managers making above $125,000. Millions of New Yorkers manage to survive on salaries less than $100,000 annually.
Larry Penner

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Joe R.

Yes!!! Let me ask you this – have you ever gone over to one of the centers to pick up a school lunch? Those are not that expensive. But yet you have ’em talking about 1) security deposit as rent and 2) feeding New York. First of all, last time I checked, security deposit is only 1 month. It’s been 3+ months already since this thing started. Second, yeah you’re “feeding New York” but what about more important things like the rent or mortgage, what about people in specific conditions that need help now? What happens is that during good times you were too busy playing politics, and now you wanna go around saying “this is not a time for politics”. Lol. Really?

And another thing about the salaries – they’re not going to reduce their salaries. They already voted on whether they should give themselves a raise – “hmmm, should we give ourselves a raise?” what a difficult matter to vote on, don’t you think? But did you see even their staff members get a $1 raise? Not really. They’re paying a lot of them $20,000 a year. And how many of them said, “This is not fair, I don’t accept this raise.” Not even a handful, even while knowing that the bill was gonna pass. If they didn’t look out for their staffers like that, they’re not looking out for the people who voted them in either.

Now do you still think they’re gonna give themselves a paycut?

Notice how there’s never money, in good times and bad times, there’s never any money left. Somebody has to have common sense here. How is it that New York City, with all the tourism, with all the property taxes collected, with all the revenue generated, has no money? Isn’t that a bit off?

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