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Moya arrested at rally pushing for $15 minimum wage

Moya

Moya

Dec. 2, 2016 By Hannah Wulkan

A local politician was arrested this week for civil disobedience at a rally pushing for a $15 minimum wage in New York.

Assemblymember Francisco Moya joined Service Employees International Union 32BJ in a National Day of Disruption” protest demanding a $15 minimum wage in Lower Manhattan early Tuesday.

“After the results of the election, we need to reassure people pulling 80 hour work weeks only to remain stuck beneath the poverty line that we still have their back,” Moya added.

Several hundred workers gathered by Zucotti Park early Tuesday morning, including those working in fast-food or airport jobs, or other low paying jobs throughout the city.

The protesters chanted and carried signs, and some sat in the street on Broadway blocking traffic.

Police arrested more than 20 of the protesters, including Moya, though he was quickly released with a desk appearance summons and a court date for next month.

“The point of civil disobedience is to put a spotlight on an issue and I have no regrets about taking a trip to the precinct if it means more people understand the real struggles low-wage families face,” Moya said.

Though a $15 minimum wage was signed in to law by Governor Andrew Cuomo in April, Moya said that the issue that still needs attention.

“The Fight for 15 campaign has already celebrated victories in many cities, including New York where workers are finally on the path to a $15 minimum wage. The rallies held this week built on that momentum, bringing the movement further on the national stage so that workers in all 50 states can have economic justice,” he said.

Similar protests demanding fair wages for service workers took place in hundreds of cities throughout the country on Tuesday.

Councilmembers Antonio Reynoso, Mark Levine and Brad Lander also participated in the protest.

Click here for NY1 coverage of protest.

email the author: news@queenspost.com

2 Comments

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Marco

Funny all these cops for this minion. Also, since the city has to deploy all these officers, they should make his offense more serious,like a 20k fine and 30 days in rikers. There will be second thoughts when it comes to pulling stunts like this

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Marco

Half the people that work minimum wage jobs dont deserve the wage they get now. They are slow lazy and dont care and this idiot gets himself arrested trying to get these slackers almost double. Guaranteed he wouldnt be fighting for the raise if he owned a mcdonalds or a similar venue. I say leave it the same and put an incentive clause in place to motivate these non skilled laborers

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