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More Than 1,200 Queens Restaurants Open For Outdoor Dining: Map

Outdoor Dining at Soleluna in Sunnyside (Queens Post File Photo)

June 29, 2020 By Christian Murray

The city has released a new map that provides the public with a list of restaurants across the five boroughs offering outdoor dining.

The Department of Transportation has posted the map online–called “NYC Open Restaurants“—that provides a growing list of the more than 6,200 restaurants now offer outdoor dining.

The public is able to search a restaurant by name, borough and zip code and even find out if alcohol is being served.  There are 1,210 establishments listed in Queens, with 40 in Sunnyside, 88 in Long Island City, 56 in Forest Hills, and more.

The guide was introduced following the city entering into Phase 2 last Monday, when some restrictions were lifted. Phase 2 allows bars and restaurants to provide outdoor dining as long as social distancing measures are in place.

The map shows what outdoor dining options are available— including tables on sidewalks and parking lanes.

This week, some restaurants will be able to set up on the street.

The DOT is accepting applications from business improvement districts and various associations to set up seating on roadways that were part of the Open Streets program.

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Larry Penner

In these difficult economic times, it is especially important to patronize your favorite restaurants as they reopen. Let us honor the employees who make them a success. There are several ways to say thank you. Let your server(s), cooks and owners know how much you appreciate the excellent food and service.

My wife and I try to tip 20 percent against the total bill including taxes. If it is an odd amount, round up to the next dollar. If you can afford to eat out, you can afford an extra dollar tip. When ordering take out, don’t forget to leave a dollar or two for the waiter or cook. Trust us, it is appreciated.

Remember the people who work at your favorite restaurant are our neighbors. They work long hours for little pay and count on tips, which make up a significant portion of their income. If we don’t patronize our local restaurants, they don’t eat either. Your purchases keep our neighbors employed and the local economy growing.

Why not drop off a box of candy, cookies or some other treat for your favorite waiter or restaurant staff next time you stop by?

Larry Penner

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