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Jackson Heights Woman Sentenced to Probation, Mental Counseling for Abuse of 54 Animals: DA

25-44 82nd Street

April 30, 2018 By Christian Murray

A Jackson Heights woman has been sentenced to 3 years probation and has been prohibited from owning animals for at least 10 years after being found guilty of animal cruelty charges, the Queens District Attorney announced today.

Elizabeth Grant, 50, who is also required to undergo mental counseling, was convicted last month of 108 counts of animal cruelty for failing to provide adequate care for 54 cats and dogs she housed in a urine-and feces-filled home.

She faced up to two years in prison and a ban on owning animals for life prior following her conviction.

The pets, 67 in all, were rescued in January 2016 and most had extreme health problems including malnutrition and infections, according to the District Attorney. Twelve were in such poor health they had to be euthanized.

“The defendant collected cats and dogs. Sadly, the animals suffered while living in a home where the floors and furnishings were covered in feces, fur and urine,” said Queens District Attorney Richard A. Brown. “No one should live in such squalor, including the furry four-legged residents of Queens County.”

The animals were discovered when a police officer went to Grant’s 25-44 82nd Street home to visit her mother, who had been the victim of a crime. The officer knocked on the door, but no one answered. The officer found that the door was open and spotted animals inside the house living in filthy conditions.

The officer came back on Jan. 28 with members of the ASPCA. When Grant’s mother opened the door, they saw that the house was covered in feces, fur and trash and reeked of urine. The animals inside the house had patches of missing fur and crusty eyes. One of the cats appeared to be unable to walk.

A search warrant was executed the same day. ASPCA members rescued 55 cats, 12 dogs and two turtles. The workers who rescued the animals needed to wear respirators and protective clothing, Brown said.

A veterinarian and supervisor from the ASPCA’s Forensic Services unit examined the dogs and cats and discovered that many of the pets had severe dental diseases, ear infections, ear mites and many other ailments.

Brown described the Grant’s actions as “depraved.”

“Taking in a dog or cat is a huge responsibility,” said Brown. “In addition to hugs and love, pets need food, a clean home and meticulous care.”

email the author: news@queenspost.com

22 Comments

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Concerned citizen

I agree. There was a cat infestation in my area because one lady was feeding all the cats. So the cats naturally returned. The worst part is they started to breed and more and more cats started to pop up. Big problem is that the cats can’t pick up their own feces, so who should? The lady that feeds them? Or is it the responsibility of the neighbor whose house the cat just defiled?

Would you feed an infant and not clean up their poop? Isn’t that neglect and against the law?

One of the neighbors tried to poison some of the cats, which is wrong but I can’t really judge him for trying. I’ve called animal control before and they said they can’t do anything unless the cats are malnourished. The only service was this group that came and caught most of the cats, neutered/spaded so they won’t be able to breed. I had no idea that group even existed. If I had known that, I would have called them a long time ago.

The point is, some people think they are helping animals and believe what they’re doing is good. But, in doing so they are doing more harm than good to the neighborhood.
And if you believe you’re a good person and you feed these animals, then I’ll believe you when you pick up all the feces that come along with it.

These issues need to be dealt with at a higher echelon, like the community boards, and not by individuals alone.

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ms

IT IS AGAINST THE LAW TO POISON CATS — not only is it illegal, it’s immoral, cruel, sadistic, depraved — I frequently find dog poop on the sidewalks & streets — I walk around the poop and let nature take care of the cleanup — are you going to blame the cats for the dog poop? — so, is this about poop OR about cat-haters? — I hear no one recommending to poison the dogs. — TNR is the only humane answer — I, an individual, participate in the TNR program — I trap the cats (1-2 at a time OR whenever they arrive onto my driveway), bring them to Clinic for neutering, spaying, necessary inoculations, etc., and then return them to their original locations. — some of the cats may be deemed friendly and if you have an adopter, you then have a match and kitty has a new indoor home. — If there are a high volume of cats, the ASPCA can bring out their medical vans to rescue them — if you want to DO THE RIGHT THING, contact the ASPCA about rescuing these cats — if you already have a relationship with a TNR Rescuer, then PLEASE call this Rescuer — we do NOT want a society where people commit sadistic, unconscionable crimes to cats — this is NYC, USA, filled with educated, enlightened people, year 2018 — let’s be compassionate, rational, sane & caring. — REMEMBER, engage in humane methods for free-roaming cats — look into TNR — TNR is good for the cats, good for the community, good for the people who respect & care about animals! — THE CATS WANT TO LIVE — ENSURE THEY GET FOOD & SHELTER — ENSURE THEY GET HELP — TNR works!

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Captain Obvious

You should go around and pick up the dog poop since it doesn’t bother you , take pride in your neighborhood.

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roberto

something tells me that she already has violated her probation already!!!

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Ben the Rat

I’ve seen inside that place and I can tell you that I prefer the sewer!

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Elaine Gross

If you do a search on her property with the DOB website, two complaint were lodged about some sort of building being built in the yard. One can only guess what they’ll use they for. Another house of horrors.

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Paul O'Reilley

Just did. Looney isn’t even the word that best describes it. Somebody give that lady her meds, and fast!

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Eileen Bennett

Oh my God that’s all she got?? Probation and mental health
Counseling??
The 2 yr. Prison sentence is far more appropriate for this creature. Those poor animal’s deserved so much more in this life. I hope for the ones who survived that it’s better for them now .

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Kevin

Eileen- What’s jail going to accomplish in this case? I think people who are always looking to jail others should be jailed.

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Eileen

You don’t think she should be off the street and away from harming other animals? Are they going to check up on her regularly, I don’t think so.
Let me ask you what would it take for you to agree that she should be removed from society?
What these animal’s endured throughout their lives must have been horrendous. And I should be jailed? Oh please grow up.

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Kevin

Eileen- Nobody is disputing what these animals endured. The woman is being monitored. There are other ways to “keep people off the streets” than prison, you obviously don’t know what prison is like or about. Prison should be reserved for the violent and dangerous.,You should spend some time in prison at least you would know what you were talking about. Prison only makes mentally ill people worse. Fact!!

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Tommy O

Hey Eileen- 1-Ms. Grant was not on the street. 2-This person has not demonstrated any behavior that would be a threat to people or society as a whole except for the unsanitary conditions of her home which is not violent or shows intent to harm others. She was convicted on “108 counts of animal cruelty for failing to provide adequate care for 54 cats and dogs she housed in a urine-and feces-filled home”. This is not a violent felon. This is more like a person with good intentions who just gets herself in way over her head, which is actually a mental disorder in itself. She definitely does need some type of supervision since she was already forbidden to own animals from a previous neglect conviction and defied the court.At least she tries to help animals in the streets, even with her diminished capacity, what do you do? Prison isn’t always the answer and as history has shown prison actually makes many things worse.

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roberto

What happens when probation arrives at the home and finds animals in it????

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Roberto

Eileen- This mentally ill woman is no where the threat to society that your venemous words are.

Roberto

Roberto – if probation cones and finds any indication or evidence of animals on the premise, the animals are removed and the woman violated with a. trip to jail or a psych ward.

Harvey the Flea

Me and my family is banking on Lizzy Grant breakin’ parole and gettin’ herself a bunch more tasty dogs and cats. We’re hungry and times is tough. Who loves ya, Lizzy!

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ms

You’re right — It’s quite sad — she wanted to help these animals, but went about it the wrong way — she needed help & advice — the ASPCA has a TNR program and a cat adoption program — if only someone would’ve contacted them — thank God the cats have been taken away from her — I wish it were done sooner — but now we all KNOW — cats MUST be neutered & spayed as soon as possible — also they get necessary shots to protect their health — when this is all done, we can all relax — the next thing is to find adopters — some people take these cats in and, finally, kitty has a home — some remain outdoors with caretakers ensuring they have food, water & shelter. In my area, there are 6 caretakers, who I personally know of, who daily ensure kitties have what they need until they get indoor permanent homes. — There’s always a GOOD, POSITIVE option available — even if cat gets a temporary home or a foster home, it’s better than languishing, suffering on the streets.

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ms

It’s quite sad — she wanted to help these animals, but went about it the wrong way — she needed help & advice — the ASPCA has a TNR program and a cat adoption program — if only someone would’ve contacted them — thank God the cats have been taken away from her — I wish it were done sooner — but now we all KNOW — cats MUST be neutered & spayed as soon as possible — also they get necessary shots to protect their health — when this is all done, we can all relax — the next thing is to find adopters — some people take these cats in and, finally, kitty has a home — some remain outdoors with caretakers ensuring they have food, water & shelter. In my area, there are 6 caretakers, who I personally know of, who daily ensure kitties have what they need until they get indoor permanent homes. — There’s always a GOOD, POSITIVE option available — even if cat gets a temporary home or a foster home, it’s better than languishing, suffering on the streets.

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ms

Thank God they were rescued — Thank you to the wonderful rescuers — if only more people were alert to such situations — the suffering undergone by these animals is heartbreaking.

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